Your Questions Answered

We have put together a collection of frequently asked questions. If there is
any other topic you would like to discuss please give us a call on 0113 274 5126,
email us at info@leeds-complementary.co.uk or use our 'get in touch' form

About Osteopathy

What does the word Osteopath mean?
Osteopath can be broken down into “osteo” and “path” (from Greek); osteo means bone and path means disease. An osteopath is someone who practises osteopathy which can be defined, in general terms, as a therapy which works on problems of the musculoskeletal system.

Many people think that we just work on bones and only treat backs and necks but we can (and do!) treat any joint or muscle in the body including necks, knees, shoulders, ankles and feet. We can also work on the viscera (the organs such as the digestive system, the liver or the lungs).

The term “osteopath” is a legally protected term and you can only call yourself an osteopath once you are registered with the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC).
What is Osteopathy?
Osteopathy is a philosophy and form of alternative healthcare that emphasizes the interrelationship between structure and function of the body, as well as the body’s ability to heal itself.

Osteopaths seek to restore the optimal functioning of the body, where possible without the use of drugs or surgery. Osteopathy is based on the principle that the body has the ability to heal itself and osteopathic care focuses on strengthening the musculoskeletal system to treat existing conditions and to prevent illness.

Our approach is patient centred and as such means we consider symptoms in the contexzt of your full medical history. Osteopathy is a unique holistic (whole body) approach to health care. Osteopaths do not simply concentrate on treating the problem area, but use a range of techniques to balance all the systems of the body, to provide overall good health and wellbeing.

Dr. Andrew Taylor Still established osteopathy in the late 1800s in the USA, with the aim of using hands on techniques to improve circulation and correct altered biomechanics, without the use of drugs.
A brief history of Osteopathy
Dr Andrew Taylor Still founded osteopathy in 1874. He was originally a Doctor in a small town in Kansas; there he grew increasingly disenchanted with the medical profession at that time, which was crude and usually ineffective due to poor training. When four of his children contracted meningitis and despite his best efforts at the time three of his children died. Still threw himself into research. He was drawn to the mechanical similarities of farm machinery and the human body and reasoned that small adjustments in the mechanical aspects of the machinery made big differences in its performance. From this Still founded two principles:

The first is that the body contains within itself the means to combat disease to maintain health provided the body has a suitable environment and nutrition, or to put it another way the natural tendency of the body is to repair and recover. The second is that structure and function are interrelated i.e. if the structure of the body is sound, the body has a better chance of functioning well, maintaining health or recovering from disease.

Although Stills principles are still in practice they have been refined and aided by osteopathic and medical research over the past one hundred years.
What is the difference between Osteopathic and Chiropractic Treatment?
The treatments between osteopaths and chiropractors have a lot of similarities but also loads of differences both are regulated health professions which mean you do not need to go and see your doctor in order to see either, as we have all been taught how to make a working diagnosis of you problem, this means that on occasion we will refer you to the GP or other healthcare professional.

Whilst most physiotherapist tend to be more exercise prescriptive and use electrotherapy equipment, like TENS, ultrasound etc) and will aim to rehabilitate you after an injury and they tend to work within the NHS. Whilst osteopaths tend to more hands on and see people who are in pain or discomfort and tend to work privately.

Generally speaking, osteopathic treatment probably involves more work on the soft tissues and fewer thrust techniques than chiropractic. Osteopaths tend to be more gentle than Chiropractors and Physiotherapy tends to be more exercise led, with less hands on treatment. Physiotherapists also use more electrotherapy equipment (TENS, ultrasound etc) and the majority of physiotherapy is within the NHS.

However, I believe there are many areas of overlap and we have also borrowed each other techniques so you have physiotherapist who use a lot of manipulations and Osteopaths who use more electrotherapy equipment.
Is there a recognised official body for osteopaths?
Yes there is a recognised official body for osteopaths.

We are regulated by and have to be registered with The General Osteopathic Council– which ensures that we are safe to practice and you are in safe hands. You can find them at www.osteopathy.org.uk.

It is the General Osteopathic Council which ensures patient safety.

The word osteopath is a legally protected name which means it is illegal to call oneself an osteopath without being on the register.

There is also the British Osteopathic Association (BOA). The BOA supports, cares, represents, advises and protects its members.

The BOA is a merger of the three professional bodies representing osteopaths and was formed in 1998. The roots of the three founder member organisations are deep and a more detailed history can be found on the BOA website. You can find them at www.osteopathy.org

“The British Osteopathic Association, through its Executive and its elected Council, represents the views of members to the General Osteopathic Council, the Department of Health, local and national government agencies and other professional bodies. Through our representative body, annual convention and publications, we obtain members’ opinions on osteopathic and business issues. We believe our stand-alone independence is vital in carrying out our representational role and we conduct our business on the basis of openness and transparency.”
Is osteopathy recognised as a mainstream, medical profession?
Yes, believe it or not we are a primary care physician – the same as a GP is – the main difference being that we are not trained in surgery or pharmacology, but studied the art and science of osteopathy instead.

Osteopathy is regulated and was the first complementary therapy to have undergone statutory regulation by Parliament. This gives an osteopath similar status to a doctor or dentist and guarantees a patient the equivalent high level of protection.

All osteopaths in the UK are regulated by the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC).

The Statutory Register of the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC) was opened in May 1988. The term ‘Osteopath’ was protected in law in May 2000. It is against the law for anyone to call themselves an osteopath unless they are registered with the GOsC, which sets and promotes high standards of competency, conduct and safety. The GOsC can, and will, prosecute individuals who practice as osteopaths when they are not on the GOsC Register.

To qualify, your osteopath will have undergone a 4-5 year accredited course at an established osteopathic institution. This training and qualification ensures that your osteopath is safe and competent to practice.

Osteopaths are required to renew their registration each year and GOsC provide registrants with an annual license to practice. As part of this process, the GOsC checks that osteopaths have current professional indemnity insurance, remain in good health and of good character, and have met mandatory continuing professional development requirements.

All osteopaths at Leeds Complementary Therapy Centre are registered with the GOsC.
How do I know if my osteopath is registered?
“How do I know if my osteopath is registered” is an essential question to ensure that you get the best treatment.

To check if your osteopath is registered you can go to Finding An Osteopath on the General Osteopathic Council’s website.

If you can’t find the osteopath you are looking for or you need further help, contact the General Osteopathic Council on info@osteopathy.org.uk or phone 020 7357 6655 ext. 242.
What do Osteopaths Treat?
Whilst we cannot put a complete list of the things that osteopaths can treat as this may limit the potential and scope of osteopathy osteopaths are capable of treating a wide range of problems.

For example before the age of antibiotics osteopaths help the reputation for being helpful in the treatment of pneumonia. However it is safe to say that generally if there is a problem with a joint or muscle an osteopath can treat it. Whilst osteopathy may not look to be an obvious choice for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome until you realise that essentially the bowel is made up of muscles and that muscles become tight when stressed.

Therefore there are many conditions that osteopathy can help, whilst it is obvious that osteopathy cannot cure chronic conditions such as arthritis it can help to lessen many of its painful features. Some common problems may include: - back pain - sciatica - muscle tension - minor sprains and strains - arthritic pain - nerve pain - minor sports injuries - joint pain, shoulder, knee , ankle, elbow or wrist - neck ache - headache (from the neck) - work strain - postural issues - pregnancy and birth preparation - symptoms of chronic conditions such as arthritis and asthma.

About Treatments, Payments & Our Clinic

What happens before your first treatment?
Before your appointment

You are welcome to bring a friend or relation into the treatment room if you wish and anyone under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a chaperone.

Our Clinic is on the first floor, so if you have a problem with stairs, please advise our receptionist when making an appointment.

On arrival please press the buzzer and we will answer the intercom and let you in. There are two flights of stairs to the waiting room but if you find stairs difficult there are two chairs at the top of the first set of stairs where you can wait, this is the same level as the treatment rooms are on so you will not have to go up andy more satirs.

We have both male and female osteopaths, so if you would prefer to be treated by an osteopath of the same gender as yourself, this isn’t a problem. Just tell our friendly receptionist when you book your appointment.

Depending on which treatment you are having, your appointment will be between 30-60 minutes long.

You will then be met by your practitioner and taken into the treatment room.

What happens during your first treatment?
During your appointment

Before any examination and treatment is carried out you will be asked some questions about yourself – we need to know about your health, past and present, and you will be asked more detailed questions about your symptoms and their history, your medical history (including operations and illnesses) and any medication you are taking (both prescribed and “over the counter”). Although some questions may seem unnecessary, all this information is important and helps us to make a diagnosis and develop a suitable treatment plan for you. All case histories are completely confidential and will not be released without your consent. This also applies to any conversations that take place during treatment.

Once we have all the information we need we will move onto examining you. In order to do a full examination you will normally be asked to undress to your underwear so we can see not only the area which is causing problems, but also other areas which may be related to your condition.

We appreciate that undressing can be concerning and something that you may be embarrassed about – please do not be. Don’t forget, you can always bring a friend or relation into the treatment room. If you are concerned about undressing, please discuss this with us and we will work with you to ensure that we are able to examine and treat you sufficiently whilst respecting your wishes.

You may be asked to perform certain movements and certain tests may be carried out (i.e. reflexes, blood pressure) in order to help us understand and assess your condition.

We will discuss our assessment with you, and in most cases some treatment will be given. Treatment is hands-on and will involve articulation and mobilisation of joints and stretching of muscles. Please remember that we are working together with you and that if you find any treatment technique uncomfortable or painful, please do not be afraid to tell your practitioner to stop.

As treatment is hands-on and we are effectively getting your body to move differently, you may experience some aches, stiffness and feeling a bit “bruised” afterwards. This is completely normal, but if you are concerned, please do not hesitate to call us so that we can reassure you.

What happens after your first treatment?
After your appointment

We do not have set treatment plans saying how many treatments you will need. How many treatments you will need and at what internals will be determined by what you would like to achieve with treatment, what we find on examination and then how quickly your body responds to treatment.

If we believe that your GP should be given information about your health, or we require further details of your medical history, your consent must be given before we can contact your GP.

If we do not think you will benefit from our treatment we will explain this to you and may recommend the next course of action.
Do I need to be referred by my doctor to get an appointment?
And the answer is: No

Osteopaths are primary healthcare professionals so you do not need a GP referral to have treatment.

Osteopaths are skilled in diagnostic techniques and trained to identify if you are not suitable for osteopathic treatment and need to be referred to your GP or on to another healthcare professional.

Most patients refer themselves directly to an osteopath.

We have a good working relationship with the local GPs so you may find that they may recommend some osteopathic treatment, but they are unable to provide it on the NHS.
How much do our treatments cost & can I pay by cash?
Our fees are £37.00 for adults and £32.00 for under 16. Yes, you can pay by cash ad we accept most major credit and debit cards.
How long has Leeds Complementary Therapy Centre been established?
Mae Chen established the established the clinic over 25 years ago Nicola took over the clinic when she retired 20 years ago and has been running it ever since. During that time the clinic has grown steadily based on patient referrals.
What do Osteopaths treat?
Whilst we cannot put a complete list of the things that osteopaths can treat as this may limit the potential and scope of osteopathy osteopaths are capable of treating a wide range of problems.

For example before the age of antibiotics osteopaths help the reputation for being helpful in the treatment of pneumonia. However it is safe to say that generally if there is a problem with a joint or muscle an osteopath can treat it. Whilst osteopathy may not look to be an obvious choice for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome until you realise that essentially the bowel is made up of muscles and that muscles become tight when stressed.

Therefore there are many conditions that osteopathy can help, whilst it is obvious that osteopathy cannot cure chronic conditions such as arthritis it can help to lessen many of its painful features. Some common problems may include: - back pain - sciatica - muscle tension - minor sprains and strains - arthritic pain - nerve pain - minor sports injuries - joint pain, shoulder, knee , ankle, elbow or wrist - neck ache - headache (from the neck) - work strain - postural issues - pregnancy and birth preparation - symptoms of chronic conditions such as arthritis and asthma.
Do you offer anything at the clinic apart from Osteopathy?
Yes, we have several other practitioners who also work at the centre they are:

Mick Hartley Psychotherapist Tel: 07941-488851 Email:michael@leedspsychotherapy.co.uk www.leedspsychotherapy.co.uk

Nicola Miller Psychotherapist & work with boarding school survivors Tel: 0113-2171441 Email: nicola.miller70@ntlworld.com

Rosemary Owen Hypnotherapist Tel: 07956-501964 www.rosemary-owen-hypnotherapy.com

Christine Perry Member of the British Institute of Electrolysis Tel: 0113-2780286 Email: cristelperry@hotmail.co.uk

Simon Roe Men’s Work Tel: 0113-2890445 07986783460 www.mandorla-menswork.org

Kay Kirkby Holistic Aromatherapist, Life Coach & NLP Practitioner Tel: 0775-3854089

Sarah Nolan Acupuncture, Fengshui Emotional Freedom Technique Tel: 0113-2697474 07906-747213 Email: Snolan481@live.com

Jacqueline Beattie Registered Homeopath Tel: 0113-2747063 Email: jbeattie@talktalk.net www.leeds-homeopathy.co.uk
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